Reduction of Risk of Wildlife Loss- what are the numbers ?

preventative actions
Share this article: FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

 

 Animals and Aircraft do not share their common habitat well

2019 statistics show improvement, but still negative impact

FAA, USDA and ACRP have risk reduction 

The effort to preserve wildlife which are in and around airports plus even more difficultly, in the air, is a constant campaign. The numbers of 2019, based on an FAA and USDA report, are both discouraging and illuminating as to improvement. Here are the numbers:

  • 2019 over the 2018  increase of 1,007 wildlife strikes in total, a jump of 6%.
  •  longer term 1990- 2019 wildlife strikes annually reported has increased more than 9-fold from 1990 to a record high of 17,228 in 2019,
  •  2010-2020 damaging  strikes increased only slightly since 2010 and are still below the record number in 2000
  •  2000 and 2019 damaging strikes declined 4% between, from 743 to 710;

*Most pronounced reduction for commercial aircraft in the airport environment (at greater than 1,500 feet above ground level), but

* has not declined for general aviation.

The report expresses some confidant that the USDA, FAA and ACRP have developed some useful approaches to minimize risks of loss of further wildlife and humans:

 

wildlife studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some past posts which discussed these creative preventative actions:

A Bird In A USDA Net May Save Lives: Wildlife Management At Airports

Dayton Airport Experiments With Natural Barriers To Wildlife: Great Aviation Safety Gain?

ACRP’s Reports Saves Wildlife And Adds To Airport Safety

strategies

 

 

 

 

Airport Wildlife Management Version Of “Fear The Turtle” Slogan

IG’S REPORT CRITICISM OF FAA WILDLIFE HAZARD PROGRAM—INSIGHTFUL OR INANE?

Bird Strikes And Awareness By Aviation Safety Professionals

solutions


Published: Mar 12, 2021

USDA Wildlife Services Shares Reports on Wildlife Hazards to Aviation

 

faa usda cover

In February, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the United States Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services released Wildlife Strikes to Civil Aircraft in the United States: 1990-2019. Through an interagency agreement, Wildlife Services’ Airport Wildlife Hazards Program reviews and compiles all reported wildlife strikes to the FAA National Wildlife Strike Database (NWSD) to ensure data quality and consolidates duplicate reports. Wildlife Services also enters wildlife strikes from various sources not reported through the FAA’s on-line reporting portal.

Wildlife Strikes to Civil Aircraft presents a summary analysis for the 30-year period, 1990 through 2019. The 2019 total of reported wildlife strikes showed an increase of 1,007 wildlife strikes (6 percent) compared to 2018. The number of wildlife strikes annually reported has increased more than 9-fold from 1990 to a record high of 17,228 in 2019. Wildlife strike reporting is vital to managing safety for both aviation and avian species. The FAA and Wildlife Services, which assists with strike avoidance at more than 890 airports throughout the country, agree that the problem of wildlife hazards cannot be fully addressed without knowing the species of wildlife involved.

Although overall numbers of reported strikes continue to rise, those causing damage have increased only slightly since 2010 and are still below the record number in 2000. Damaging strikes declined 4 percent between 2000 and 2019, from 743 to 710. This decline has been most pronounced for commercial aircraft in the airport environment (at <1,500 feet above ground level) but has not declined for general aviation.

usda bird

Management actions conducted by airports and their biologists to mitigate the risk have been implemented at many airports since the 1990s. These are likely responsible for the reduction in damaging strikes or those with a negative effect-on-flight at passenger-certificated airports between 2000-2019 despite continued increases in populations of many large bird species. Wildlife Services provides a wide range of technical and direct management assistance at airports and military airbases, domestically and overseas. Its National Wildlife Research Center scientists conduct research that provides a scientific foundation for management programs. (Protecting the Flying Public, FY19.)

Strikes occur every day, but when compared to the total number of flights they are rare. Although eliminating all strikes at all times may be impossible, comprehensive assessment, planning and management techniques have successfully mitigated damaging strikes on or near airports. Combined with systematic evaluation and adaptation of techniques, safety can be increased.

 

prevention posters



 

Share this article: FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Be the first to comment on "Reduction of Risk of Wildlife Loss- what are the numbers ?"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.