The on- and off-floor Agenda at ICAO 40th Assembly- FAA has a lot to do

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Global aviation leaders gather amid climate protests, MAX safety talks

There’s a long and technical agenda

Then there’s CORSIA

And the FAA Administrator meeting on the B737 Max8

 

By Allison Lampert

MONTREAL, Sept 22 (Reuters) – Global aviation leaders will be under pressure to deepen efforts to tackle airline emissions as they gather this week under the shadow of protests led by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg.

 

 

 

 

The 16-year-old, who inspired a ‘flight-shaming’ protest movement against aviation and sailed across the Atlantic rather than board a plane, is expected to join a march on Friday in Montreal as 193 nations meet at the U.N. aviation agency.

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The International Civil Aviation Organization holds its assembly every three years and its 75th-anniversary gathering starting on Tuesday comes at a time of growing concerns about climate change and a six-month-old grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX jetliner.

On Monday, the head of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, Steve Dickson, will brief global regulators about delayed progress in approving MAX flights, which were halted in March following two fatal crashes.

The grounding is not on the agenda of the Sept. 24-Oct. 4 assembly but regulators will be anxious to avoid divisions on the sidelines over actions needed to restore the jet to service.

The debate over aviation’s impact on the environment will be a major topic for the public side of the talks, however.

Commercial flying accounts for 2.5% of carbon emissions. But with passenger numbers forecast to double to 8.2 billion by 2037, experts say emissions will rise if no action is taken.

At its last full meeting in 2016, ICAO fostered the first global industrial climate initiative with a medium-term scheme to help airlines avoid adding to their net emissions from 2020.

The Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) requires most airlines to limit emissions or offset them by buying credits from environmental projects.

The industry says around $40 billion in climate financing will be generated between 2020 and 2035.

The move eased the threat of a trade war after the European Union initially imposed its own emissions scheme unilaterally, but environmentalists say it did not go far enough.

The EU, some campaigners and the industry itself want ICAO to commit now to setting longer-term goals at its 2022 assembly – though they may well differ sharply over what they should be.

 


ICAO 40th Assembly

Agenda and Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

Our resident ICAO expert, Jim Loos, recently described the workings on this UN aviation safety agency

During my involvement (getting more past every year) ICAO, especially in the Commission, was as apolitical and effective as any international organization can be. It was slow sometimes, well most times, but it was effective and contributed significantly to the safety of international flight. It has to stay that way or we’re in deep trouble.

Here are the partial agendas of the six committees that will be presented to the Assembly over its sessions:

Consideration of topics like

      CANDIDATURE OF ARAB MEMBER STATES

АЯВЛЕНИЕ РОССИЙСКОЙ ФЕДЕРАЦИИ

FINANCING FOR QUALITY AVIATION INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

THE SINGLE AFRICAN AIR TRANSPORT MARKET: SUSTAINABLE REGULATORY SYSTEM

ADVANCING INITIATIVES THAT SUPPORT WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION IN AVIATION

THE EXPERIENCE OF THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES IN EMPOWERING WOMEN IN AVIATION

REPORT ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE UNIVERSAL SAFETY OVERSIGHT AUDIT PROGRAMME (USOAP) CONTINUOUS MONITORING APPROACH (CMA)

TARGETED AND PRECISE OVERSIGHT IN THE CIVIL AVIATION INDUSTRY OF CHINA

CRIMINALIZING ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS THREATENS AVIATION SAFETY

ICAO GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL TRENDS – PRESENT AND FUTURE AIRCRAFT NOISE AND EMISSIONS

UPDATE ON THE CARBON OFFSETTING AND REDUCTION SCHEME FOR INTERNATIONAL AVIATION (CORSIA)

The last two topics are why Ms. Greta Thunberg and her friends have traveled to Montreal, but the other agenda items are critical to the long term work of ICAO.

Frequently, a lot of work at the Assemblies is accomplished off of the Assembly floor, in the coffees and in collateral cocktail events. The #1 such discussion at Montreal this week will be

FAA Aims for Detente at Summit on Boeing 737 Max’s Future

“…Dickson told media outlets that he hopes other regulators will follow the FAA’s lead on its the 737 Max reviews. He defended the FAA’s stature, even as many other countries opted to ground the 737 Max sooner than the U.S.

‘I think the FAA has done more over the decades to promote global aviation safety than any other agency in the world,’ Dickson said.

‘Now, do we have some process improvements that need to be made?” he said. “You always need to be looking at ways to improve. You always need to be coming at this from a standpoint of humility’.”

Captain Dickson will be the hardest working delegate at the 40th Assembly!!!



 

 

 

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