NBAA formulates Top Safety Focus Areas to RAISE AWARENESS

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Today’s Aviation Safety relies on Big Data

Accumulation and Analysis need added staff

NBAA develops Focus Areas for it Members

Aviation has made great strides in reducing risks and some or most of this advance can be attributed to the collection and analysis of data which forms a basis for analysis and proactive solutions. For the airlines, the administrative burden is not that great and is justifiable based on safety improvements.

The business aviation sector does not have comparable overhead capacity with many NBAA members relying on smaller, heavily operationally oriented departments. Their association has devised excellent alternative approaches to recreate the learning potential from best shared best practices and by examining the macro numbers which related to their flight records.

NBAA issued its 2019 list of factors which its members should emphasize. Here they are:

2019 NBAA Top Safety Focus Areas

“The 2019 NBAA Top Safety Focus Areas list represents those actionable and impactful items that all organizations need to address to improve business aviation safety,” said Tom Huff, aviation safety officer for Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation and chair of the NBAA Safety Committee. “It is important to the Safety Committee that business aviation operators keep loss of control – inflight, controlled flight into terrain and runway excursions in focus, since these risks remain in the majority of business aviation accidents.”

Also, Huff said, the continued focus on single-pilot operations can help the NBAA Safety Committee Single Pilot Working Group and industry effect positive change, making the biggest impact in improving business aviation safety.

“There are few hazards unique to single-pilot operations – the hazards are just magnified,” said Huff. “NBAA is reaching out to aircraft-type clubs and local and regional groups, to highlight the association resources that are available to single pilot operators, recognizing they often don’t have the support infrastructure of larger flight departments.”

Although several topics remain on the list from previous years, one topic – safety data – has been modified for 2019 to emphasize that collecting data is not enough, operators need to share their findings with a broader audience to have a greater impact on safety, noted Paul Ratté, director of aviation safety programs at USAIG and Safety Committee team leader.

“Illuminating ways to improve an already safe and stable system is a challenge, but that’s the worthy goal of putting this list forward,” said Ratté.

“Safety has always been a core value for the business aviation community, and the NBAA Safety Committee serves an important role in identifying an annual list of top concerns to focus on each year, so we can continually enhance the industry’s safety,” said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. “These recommendations – which are based on well-researched data, and in collaboration with industry and government safety organizations, including the National Transportation Safety Board – will benefit NBAA members, and the entire aviation community.”

 

The NBAA Safety Committee has identified the association’s Top Safety Focus Areas for 2019, highlighting a number of priorities in support of a greater commitment to business aviation safety standards. These safety priorities, grouped into two areas – Top Safety Issues and Foundations for Safety – are intended to help promote safety-enhancing discussions and initiatives within flight departments and among owner-flown operations.

Download a summary version of the 2019 Top Safety Focus Areas (387KB, PDF).

Reduce the Risk of Loss of Control Inflight

Loss of control inflight (LOC-I) accidents result in more fatalities throughout general aviation than any other category of accident. The alarming consistency of catastrophic outcomes in this type of accident continue to make its contributing factors a targeted issue for safety improvement by NBAA and aviation professional organizations across the globe. Learn more about this severe threat on NBAA’s LOC-I information page, where you will find a wide variety of resources, expert safety presentations, and information on upset prevention and recovery training providers across the country.

 

Reduce the risk of Runway Excursions

Runway excursions continue to afflict the business aviation industry. Operators can prevent most excursions by mitigating well identified hazards, including adhering to stabilized approach and landing criteria, and using accurate and timely runway condition data. The Safety Committee continues to raise awareness of these highly preventable incidents by utilizing a data driven approach to enable all operators to learn from the experiences of their peers.

 

 

 

 

 

Reduce the Risk of Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT)

Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) has occurred in more than 15 percent of general aviation accidents and fatalities. Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning Systems (EGPWS) and other ground collision avoidance systems are exceptionally capable technological solutions, but not all business aviation aircraft are so equipped. Further, safety data reporting on EGPWS alerting still points to loss of terrain awareness that would have otherwise resulted in catastrophe had it not been for a last-minute save by the crew. NBAA continues to raise awareness, push for scenario-based training, and spark discussions on technology and best practices to reduce the risk of CFIT.

Reduce the Risk of Aircraft Ground Operation and Handling Incidents

Within business aviation, far more aircraft suffer damage on the ground than in the air. Although these events rarely result in serious injuries or loss of life, they can be very expensive and hinder, if not cancel altogether, any ensuing flight operations. NBAA encourages the adoption of robust Safety Management Systems (SMS) among all operators and FBOs which would include enhanced standards, training, and procedures to prevent avoidable mishaps on ramps and in hangars.

 

 

Improve the Safety Performance of Single-Pilot Operations

Single pilot operations have enhanced risks when compared to multi pilot operations, demonstrated by the fact that single pilot aircraft are 30 percent more likely to be involved in an accident than aircraft with dual pilot crews. Single pilot operations are more susceptible to task saturation; when task saturation increases, so too does the number of errors. The Safety Committee has an important role to play in arming pilots with tools and training to safely manage single pilot operations. Examples of these efforts include the annual Single-Pilot Safety Standdown event, contributions to news and resources, and further outreach to the single-pilot community.

 

Increase the Use and Sharing of Human-Reported and Automated Safety Data

Human-reported and automated safety data can provide a wealth of information to business aircraft operators. However, in a survey conducted by the NBAA Safety Committee, only 45% of association members said they participate in some sort of an automated safety data sharing effort.

In the aftermath of recent incidents, NBAA members have seen data pointing to the prevalence of common causes throughout the industry. How many incidents might business aviation prevent by taking advantage of this information before a tragedy, rather than after? Without operators utilizing or providing data, these critical failures can go unnoticed, even in the most robust SMS, resulting in incidents and potentially loss of life. The Safety Committee is developing tools to promote the use and sharing of data among business aircraft operators not already doing so.

 

Increase the Use and Sharing of Human-Reported and Automated Safety Data

 

Human-reported and automated safety data can provide a wealth of information to business aircraft operators. However, in a survey conducted by the NBAA Safety Committee, only 45% of association members said they participate in some sort of an automated safety data sharing effort.

In the aftermath of recent incidents, NBAA members have seen data pointing to the prevalence of common causes throughout the industry. How many incidents might business aviation prevent by taking advantage of this information before a tragedy, rather than after? Without operators utilizing or providing data, these critical failures can go unnoticed, even in the most robust SMS, resulting in incidents and potentially loss of life. The Safety Committee is developing tools to promote the use and sharing of data among business aircraft operators not already doing so.


One thing is certain with an NBAA project is that there will be follow up and follow up and more. A substantial improvement in aviation can be accomplished by AWARENESS. Each of these Top Safety Focus Areas will serve as reminders to the women and men who fly, maintain and operate their aircraft to be conscious of these elements as they do their jobs.



 

 

 

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