Some Independent Thoughts on the value of ADS-B to General Aviation

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Duncan Aviation, one of the GA/BA segments’ most competent MROs, has issued a “Straight Talk Book” about ADS-B. This epistle of ADS-B information, from a competent, neutral source, may help in the debate over this contested component of the future air navigation.

While almost no aviation group is opposed to the general notion of NextGen as the technological ATC solution, there are more than a few organizations which have expressed some concern about the cost or benefit or value of one or more specific element. The FAA has attempted to convince users that ADS-B, which is a key element to the implementation of the future air navigation, is worth the expenditures by both the government and the users. The Deputy Administrator, a/k/a the Chief NextGen Officer, has been a fervent advocate for this system, but the Office of the Inspector General has disagreed with equal force in its lengthy audit. The DoT’s internal watchdog asserts that the program is behind in its implementation milestones and well above the budget. The cost of equipage is also a concern of the IG.

AOPA has been quite vocal in its criticism of the ADS-B costs and characterized the benefits as being less than the FAA’s claims. Flying magazine, a highly respected publication with tremendous technical expertise, has “debunked” some of the criticisms.

In this crowded and even confused forum, Duncan Aviation has produced a reference source on this subject in eBook form . The fifty pages address the following relevant topics:

The company obviously has an interest in installing the necessary equipment, but even discounting for that “spin”, the case made is most convincingly on both technical and economic bases.

The Duncan pamphlet is an excellent effort to add some light to the debate and the company is to be commended for developing such useful explanation.

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