Obituary for an Aviation Safety Professional lost in the Wichita Crash

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Mark GoldsteinThe losses, from an airplane crash as measured in human life and property damage, are always distressing. The horrible crash at Wichita’s Mid Continent Airport resulted in the death of the four souls (three on the ground) and the hospitalization of another four. All of those deserve our sympathy. The pilot, Mark Goldstein (picture from Facebook), was an accomplished safety professional.

Mr. Goldstein had just finished a course at Flight Safety in a building next to that company’s simulators office into which his plane crashed. The aircraft, which he was flying, a 1999 King Air B200 Beechcraft, was on a flight test, in that it was being returned to service after an inspection. All reports indicate that he was an able, experienced pilot, who helped teach flying classes.

To add to the sense of loss, Mr. Goldstein had a tremendous record as an air traffic controller. According to the Air Traffic Controllers Association, a air traffic professional association, he began as a Navy controller, came to the Wichita Tower in 1983 and in 2005, ATCA won the Air Traffic Control Specialist of the Year Award, and again in 2005 Goldstein received a safety award. He retired in 2013 to devote fulltime to being a professional pilot.

That’s a lot of talent tragically lost and a graphic reminder to all safety professionals to remain ever vigilant.

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