EASA starts a path to VTOL certification

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EASA paves the way to enable safe air travel of urban air mobility and air taxi aircraft

1st step in long regulatory for airworthiness certification

Important Opportunity to Comment on Possible VTOL Standards

Many More Elements before they’re FLYING

It is a rare day when some mass media statement is made that there will be small vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft will be flying by 201_ or some more conservative predictions of a 202_ date of operations. JDA’s Mike Borfitz has defined a possible timeline which cites the relevant regulatory hurdles needed to get this concept off of the ground.

 

EASA has opened a public consultation (translation to US terminology= docket) for the public to comment on how it might certificate these innovative aircraft. The Proposed Special Condition for small-category VTOL aircraft is a 27 page document which directs attention to a number of critical issues

 

 

 

 

  • SUBPART A – GENERAL–Applicability and definitions (definition of what aircraft qualify for these standards)
  • SUBPART B – FLIGHT
  • SUBPART C -STRUCTURES
  • SUBPART D –DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
  • SUBPART E –THRUST/LIFT SYSTEM INSTALLATION
  • SUBPART F –SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT
  • SUBPART G –FLIGHT CREW INTERFACE AND OTHER INFORMATION

“EASA is committed to ensure the highest level of safety standards for operations over cities and the commercial transport of passengers while also providing lighter standards to promote innovation for the initial phases of development and other types of operation such as leisure flights. The certification objectives will therefore depend on the type of operation, providing flexibility and proportionally.

The new standards will apply to person-carrying VTOL aircraft. In its initial version, the requirement will be limited to aircraft with a passenger seating configuration of 5 or less and a maximum certified take-off mass of 2 000 kg or less.

The Agency is engaging with its international partners in order to work together towards achieving common standards.

The proposal is open for comments until 15th November.”

This process could possibly set standards for Civil Aviation Authorities to certificate future VTOLs. You should review the draft standards and consider submitting comments.[1]

 

 

After the public’s views are collated, analyzed and used to draft a second iteration of these special conditions, EASA may issue the revised standards for further review. The predictions of legal operations of VTOLs by 2019 may be premature.

Prognosis of the date of the issuance of a VTOL Certificate of Airworthiness is a matter for actuaries who work in Las Vegas’s gambling industry. Aside from the development of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Unless you have experience submitting substantive input on these standards, you might consult with someone who is familiar with the process, the regulatory “jargon” and the level of substantiation needed to impact the process.



 

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