Baltia’s Complaints About FAA’s Certification Process Are Ill Founded

Share this article: FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Aviation Daily, April 11, 2012 reported that Baltia Airlines President and CEO complained in a letter filed in the FAA’s docket and addressed to the FAA Acting Administrator, about the FAA safety organization’s lack of responsiveness, rules-driven communications barriers, and the introduction of the Safety Attributes Inspection (SAI) methodology. Mr. Dmitrowsky must have missed recent articles about carriers being denied access to EU airspace due to the failure of their home countries’ failure to exercise adequate surveillance over those airlines. The FAA has established the same rigorous, demanding standards for all carriers seeking to exercise the privileges of a Part 121 certificate and Baltia is not the first airline to have trouble achieving FAA certification.

The Part 121 certification process is complex, and the success of the process depends on the quality of the applicant’s submissions prior to a Formal Application Meeting with FAA.

To make it easier for the applicant, the FAA created a qualified certification consultant program whereby external specialists that are knowledgeable about the certification process and regulations and how to implement them into not just the airline’s procedures but their safety culture. Their function is to assist the applicant and to minimize the demands on the FAA staff. Repeated iterations between the prospective airlines and the FAA staff can be akin to “20 Questions”, but by choosing from the List of Certification Consultants, the process will run smoothly and the frustrations of the carrier and FAA can be reduced.

A certification consultant not only understands the certification process, the consultant also understands that preparation of the applicant for a Formal Application Meeting involves much more than manual preparation. Air carrier applicants must demonstrate their ability to design and document safety-critical processes that comply with the regulations and allow the applicant to identify hazards and manage risk in its operating systems and environment. The certification consultant helps the applicant understand the FAA’s system safety-based approach to air carrier certification; this is to include the implementation of a Safety Management System (SMS). Air Carriers can then fulfill their duties to provide service with the highest degree of safety in the public interest by designing their operating systems to manage the hazard-related risk in their operating environment. When done right the certification process can be completed within 15 months. How do I know? We are one of the qualified consultants who have actually done it.

Share this article: FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

1 Comment on "Baltia’s Complaints About FAA’s Certification Process Are Ill Founded"

  1. “Mr. Dmitrowsky must have missed recent articles about carriers being denied access to EU airspace due to the failure of their home countries’ failure to exercise adequate surveillance over those airlines.”
    This statement could be misleading. “Carriers” – are these airlines under the scrutiny of the FAA (American based airlines) or are they “carriers” from other countries? It just seems hard to believe that the EU would have any difficulties with an airline under the discretion of THE FINEST AIRLINE REGULATORY AGENCY IN THE WORLD………..

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.