Aviation has lost a great guy, Andy Steinberg

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andy-steinbergAndrew Steinberg, who held two of the most important aviation regulatory positions in Washington, passed away May 20 at his home in Chevy Chase, Md., of complications from ocular melanoma. He was 53. As assistant secretary of transportation for aviation and international affairs, Steinberg was instrumental in the passage of the historic U.S.-European Union open-skies treaty that changed the regulatory landscape governing the world’s busiest international markets. Prior to that, he was the chief counsel of the FAA and before joining government was general counsel of Sabre, Travelocity.com and associate general counsel of American Airlines. After leaving the Transportation Department in 2008, Steinberg was a partner in the Washington office of Jones Day, a law firm active in aviation affairs. At Jones Day, Steinberg was widely recognized for his work on aviation and greenhouse gas emissions, foreign market access and the implementation of the NextGen air traffic control modernization program


OBITUARY: Andrew B. Steinberg

Aviation has attracted a lot of good people and because it is a tough business, we have more than a few of the tough guys. Andy Steinberg was a member of the Aviation Hall of Fame as a really nice human being. Smart, articulate lawyer who was an excellent advocate, but he was not given to hyperbole. His experience was well rounded with years on the commercial side, a strong record as a safety counselor and an equally impressive series of accomplishments in the economic regulatory arena. The impressive nature of all of this professional work pales in comparison to his family life filled with love and paternal pride.

Andy was a great guy and his smile, intelligence and capabilities will be sadly missed.

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