Welcome Back to 800 Independence, Mr. Bahrami

ali bahrami faa associate Administrator for Aviation Safety
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Ali Bahrami

FAA Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety

Without a doubt, the most significant selection during FAA Administrator Michael Huerta’s term was made yesterday when he announced the appointment of Ali Bahrami, a 20 + year FAA veteran and aerospace engineer, as FAA Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety.

Ali Bahrami faa associate administratorMr. Bahrami, who currently serves as the Vice President, Civil Aviation at Aerospace Industries Association immediately faces two major challenges.

First, building on the strong foundation for the future of aviation safety laid down by former FAA Associate Administrator Peggy Gilligan, which included:

SMS, performance-based certification (Part 23 and now Part 25), consistency within the AVS organization (9 regional offices, 4 directorate offices and more than 125 field offices throughout the world), UASs, compliance and a mega sea change in the culture. Building on those initiatives will require exceptional expertise—both as to the technical and interpersonal skills.

Second, the Trump administration has placed a high priority on reducing the regulatory burden on the industry. Mr. Bahrami’s challenge will be to do it in a way that does not have a negative impact on safety.

The following recent quote leaves little doubt that Mr. Bahrami  understands the challenge and will be able to manage all of the remaining steps in transforming the prescriptive approach to establishing airworthiness standards across all four major certification standards. His experience in that aspect of the AVS jurisdiction will enable him to work down through the organization.

“While we strongly support President [Donald] Trump’s push to trim excessive, unnecessary and costly regulations, a balanced approach that involves collaboration between government and industry is needed.

The requirement that each government agency independently comply with the executive order could severely hamper the FAA’s ability to maintain the safety of the air transportation system and its ability to facilitate introduction of new entrants, such as unmanned aircraft systems and commercial space.”

Mr. Bahrami is fortunate to have John Hickey at his side as Deputy. John’s 27 years at FAA and 10 years with Boeing, coupled with his credibility with the industry and respect of the FAA workforce will serve Ali well.

Below are Mr. Bahrami’s resume (from LinkedIn) and some links to statements by him (note: one is in his capacity with AIA).

Good luck in your new job, Mr. Bahrami!!!

 



Experience

Vice President, Civil Aviation at Aerospace Industries

Leading the Civil Aviation Division addressing all issues that impact the design, manufacture, and operation of transport category airplanes, rotorcraft, engines, and parts and appliances.

• Responsible for directing policy and advocacy strategies associated with certification, air traffic management, environment, and unmanned aircraft systems.

• Responsible for coordinating the activities of multiple CEO and Senior leadership level strategic councils and other committees to address U.S. and international policies and regulatory issues and developing strategies to address them.

• Spearheading the successful completion of the Civil Aviation Division’s contribution to AIA’s annual strategic plan.

• Drafting and refining AIA’s positions on various issues and topics in order to gain industry consensus. Communicating decisions to government officials and relevant international organizations.

Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate at FAA

Deputy Directorate Manager – Transport Airplane Directorate

Various Program Management and Management Positions at FAA

Senior Engineers at Douglas Aircraft Company


Education

University of Michigan, M.S. Engineering
Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering

University of Michigan, B.S. Engineering
Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering


Recent Statements on Aviation

AIA: Gov’t Needs To Work With Industry on Reg Review

by Kerry Lynch, February 28, 2017

“While we strongly support President [Donald] Trump’s push to trim excessive, unnecessary and costly regulations, a balanced approach that involves collaboration between government and industry is needed,” said Ali Bahrami, vice president, civil aviation for AIA. “The requirement that each government agency independently comply with the executive order could severely hamper the FAA’s ability to maintain the safety of the air transportation system and its ability to facilitate introduction of new entrants, such as unmanned aircraft systems and commercial space.”

FAA Reauthorization: Q&A with AIA’s VP of Civil Aviation

By Juliet Van Wagenen | September 21, 2015

Bahrami: The 2012 FMRA had a number of provisions that we believe were important to safe and steady aviation growth. The FAA certification processes improvement, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) integration into the national air space, and creation of a Chief NexGen Officer within the FAA are some of the provisions of the Act that helped the aviation industry. Of course, we have not yet seen draft legislative language, but we have been working with appropriate committees to build on the good work that started with the implementation of the FMRA. We hope to maintain the momentum on all those areas.

Airline Safety Panel: Captain Sullenberger and Ali Bahrami

FAA, Boeing delegated much of 787 testing

By Dominic Gates

“The head of the Renton-based FAA certification office, Ali Bahrami, said he has 20 to 25 staff working full time on the 787. The entire airplane-certification division of the federal agency has fewer than 1,300 employees nationwide to cover at least six current new airplane-certification programs as well as ongoing airworthiness issues.”



 

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